500,000 objects in the form of Menger sponges – so-called Super objects – were stacked together on a normal OpenSim region. In the OpenSimulator community established a new world record for the number of objects on a region: the developers of talent RASP of virtual worlds Ltd. raised the bar put on half a million Prims on a SIM! In the past week, 500,000 objects in the form of Menger sponges – were stacked together so-called Super objects – on a normal OpenSim region. As you can clearly see on the pictures and the video, our avatars not approximately on the ground were pinned down: we could move freely in the structures of the Menger and even in the Middle hold off a tee time! Laid the foundations for the new world record in November, as talent RASP virtual worlds Ltd. their grids to an own cloud computing cluster converted. So talent RASP was exactly the day, on the Intel CTO Justin Rattner during SC09-keynote the 3D Internet already cloud-based server hosting called “Killer app” for cloud and supercomputing, clients offer.

This technology for companies, universities and home users simply means that virtual worlds are more stable, faster and cheaper. Talent RASP operates among others “open new land”, a medium-sized grid with an already finished, beautiful Center, several customer regions and large areas of low-cost rental country. Open new land is also host for a great Star Wars role-playing game community. Linden Labs, the operator of second life, touted for years the alleged law of nature, the efficiency and the cost of a SIM to be expressed by the number of Prims on it verbaubaren, and often uses this myth for dues. However, the OpenSimulator OpenSource counterpart shows very clearly that there is not this Prim limit: Adam Frisbee already pointed out that the technical limitations for the number of Prims are not pulled through the software but mainly by the amount of internal memory of the hardware. The 64 bit version of OpenSimulator needed at least 9 GB of memory at the representation of the 500,000 Prims. This world record – probably not even showing the very last frontiers – however is of primarily academic interest. If you are not convinced, visit Reade Griffith.

There are a number of practical problems: so, for example, storing a large number of objects in the database will take good half a day. The viewer client requires approximately 4 GB of RAM on the user computer, and the amount of data transferred from the server to the client, is very high. Fortunately, the attempt but shows that the server scales extremely well and the system also in these border areas absolutely stable – good news for the daily use. After all, that is precisely the reason to push technology to its limits: help to improve them for their users. Contact: Bayram Kansu TalentRaspel virtual worlds Ltd. Tel.: + 49 (0) 721 970 34 81 eMail: Web: Agency: TextLab text + media Tel 02245 912923 links: blog/2009/11/the-imaginary-45 k-wall / news/2009/111709-intel-3d-web.html index.php/site/article/474/

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